Participant supply lists. Download, and collect the necessary supplies for the class you are registered for.

 

Session One

Paper Engineering the Artist’s Book
Carol Barton

Collection Protection
Denise Carbone

Book Doctor 101

Ann Frellsen

In Search of Content
Nancy Leavitt

Editionable Imagery In and On Paper Pulp
Bridget O'Malley

 

Session Two

An Intro to Letterpress Printing & Page Design
Jean Buescher Bartlett

Tunnel Books
Andrea Dezso

A late 6th century Coptic binding: Codex C

Julia Miller

Fragments of Bookbinding Techniques
John Townsend

Moku hanga: The Japanese Woodblock Printing Technique that Helped the Overthrow of Feudalism
Martin Vinaver

SESSION ONE

Paper Engineering the Artist’s Book
Carol Barton

Discover the magic in adding movement and dimension to the flat page, using pop-up structures and layered formats. Students will learn to build sculptural forms that that rise and fall within the book as pages are turned. We will begin with simple non-adhesive cut-and-fold pop-ups and progress through a series of more complex glued constructions. Emphasis will be on combining text and visual elements with appropriate pop-up structures in order to convey one’s message. No previous paper engineering experience necessary.

Carol Barton is a book artist, curator, and teacher who has published several editions and has organized both local and national shows of artists' books. Her work is exhibited internationally and is in numerous collections, including the Library of Congress, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. She served as curator for the Smithsonian Institution’s exhibition Science and the Artist's Book. She has taught at elementary, high school, and university levels, as well as conducted adult workshops at art centers across the United States. She is on the faculty at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, where she teaches courses in bookbinding and book structures. She has had residencies at the Bogliasco Foundation in Italy and the Sacatar Foundation in Brazil. Her pop-ups were featured in National Geographic Magazine’s July, 2005, article "Zip Code 20812: It’s Only A Paper Moon." Her most recent book, The Pocket Paper Engineer, is an artist’s how-to book on paper engineering.

Collection Protection: Save Your Books from Airborne Disease,
Human Contamination & Deterioration!

Denise Carbone

Learning to make enclosures is an important collections care skill. A boxed artifact is protected from damaging environmental effects such as UV light, dust, pests, humidity and people. Protective enclosures serve as practical storage environments to store and protect your artwork, letters, photographs, prints, and books. Boxes also offer ways to organize objects and to enhance their viewing and handling. In this workshop students will learn how to fabricate some of the archival enclosures used by research libraries experienced with up-to-date conservation practices. You will construct a series of five nesting enclosures beginning with the inset box, covered by a case wrapper, encased in a self closing wrapper, swaddled by a slip case, then shielded by a multi-use box. If time permits a simple hard cover portfolio with a single tray presentation case will be demonstrated. Discussion will center on conservation principles of archival materials, recognizing and preventing conservation problems, and the importance of customized enclosures.

Denise Carbone is the Book Conservator at the American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia. She received her MFA in Book Arts/ Printmaking from The University of the Arts where she currently teaches classes in book concepts and printmaking. Her personal work challenges traditional printmaking and book structures. She incorporates a wide variety of media, including found materials, letterpress, alternative photo process, as well as her own custom manuscript inks. She has exhibited her book works and prints nationally and internationally.

Book Doctor 101: Simple Conservation Treatments and Book Repair Techniques
Ann Frellsen

Students will learn a series of repair and mending techniques, each of which builds on the previous skills mastered in the class. Students will work on a set of sample books, which they can take home. Techniques will include how to mend and re-attach torn pages, replacement of deteriorating spines, and stabilizing a loose text block. Fundamentals such as use of appropriate adhesives, archival materials and other basics will be covered.

Ann Frellsen has been the Book and Paper Collections Conservator for the Emory University Libraries since 1990. She manages the conservation lab and book repair unit of the Preservation Office, serving all of Emory’s libraries. In addition to performing complex treatments on rare books, Ann formulates policy and best practices for the Emory collections, trains and supervises a wide range of staff and students, and teaches workshops on a variety of topics, including book repair, rehousing rare materials, disaster recovery of library materials, and book arts. She is a member of the American Institute of Conservation (AIC) Book and Paper Specialty Group and the Collections Emergency Response Team (AIC-CERT), and the Southeastern Regional Conservation Association (SERCA). In her other life, Ann is a book artist. She is a founding member of the Southeast chapter of the Guild of Book Workers.

In Search of Content: The Joys and Challenges of Creating in the Book Form
Nancy Leavitt
Like an engineering project, a book is complex three-dimensional design made up of many parts. Our goal as bookmakers is to intentionally integrate all aspects of the design to strengthen the structure, form, and content of the bookwork. Through playful research, students will examine the challenges and methods in creating a handmade book and will explore various ways of collecting, analyzing, and developing content to meld with their own working style. Students will be provided with materials and instruction to design and illustrate, with their own marks, a small book of poetry. Instruction will include individual and group activities, demonstrations, and discussion.

Nancy Ruth Leavitt’s interest in the hand lettered book developed as a result of her studies in lettering and bookbinding in the United States and Great Britain. Since 1985 she has created over eighty contemporary illuminated manuscript books filled with lettering, poetry, and colorful painting. As Calligraphy Correspondent for the national chapter of the Guild of Book Workers, she writes about lettering and book arts. Her work is represented in public and private collections including the Houghton Library at Harvard, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Poetry Collection at the University of Western Michigan, Kalamazoo, and the Museum for Women in the Arts, Washington, DC. Nancy received the 2002 Stephen Harvard Award for book design from the Baxter Society. She has received several Good Idea Grants from the Maine Arts Commission for research into her craft including a project entitled “Cutting a Thousand Quills." She holds degrees in both biology and art. In her spare time she gardens and sings.

Editionable Imagery In and On Paper Pulp
Bridgett O'Malley
The connection between paper and prints is obvious. What is sometimes overlooked are the many possibilities of working editionable imagery into the paper before it is printed upon. That is what this class will focus on. Some techniques that we will explore include watermarking, pulp painting, stencils, screen-printing with paper pulp, casting onto linoleum blocks and more. In-depth experimentation and play in the studio while producing an editioned project will be the goal of the class. No prior papermaking experience necessary.

Bridget O’Malley is a master papermaker and co-owner of Cave Paper Inc, a handmade paper mill specializing in natural-dyed flax papers. She teaches papermaking at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and offers book, paper and print workshops around the country. She studied papermaking with Timothy Barrett at the University of Iowa Center for the Book Research and Production Paper Facilities. While there she completed a 5-year Papermaking Apprenticeship. She also received an M.A. and M.F.A. in Printmaking from the University of Iowa. Her artwork focuses on forms found in nature, and bringing those to life through the interplay of print, paper and sculpture

 

SESSION TWO

An Intro to Letterpress Printing & Page Design Principles
Jean Buescher Bartlett
This class will explore the relationship between image and text, between letterpress printing and collaging, between planning and improvising. Students will have a wide choice of pamphlet formats to work with as they develop their own visual vocabulary, typographic savvy, design sense, and color palette.

Jean Buescher Bartlett is an Adjunct Professor at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit. She maintains a studio and bindery in Ann Arbor's Old West Side. Jean received her MFA in Book Arts from the University of Alabama in 1989. Her work is in major collections worldwide, including the New York Public Library, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Detroit Public Library, and the University of Michigan Special Collections. She has been making limited edition, letterpress printed, illustrated books under her imprint, Bloodroot Press, teaching Book Arts workshops across the country, and working on specialized binding and printing commissions for the last twenty years.

Tunnel Books
Andrea Dezsö
When popped open, multi-layered tunnel books reveal miniature, layered worlds which viewers can peek into as into dioramas. Structurally, tunnel books belong in the same family as carousel books and toy theaters and were extremely popular during the Victorian era. In this class students will create a single-scene tunnel book based on a four-layer sewn model developed by Dezsö and a multi-scene glued model based on a book developed by historic German pop-up book innovator Lothar Meggendorfer (1847—1925).

A visual artist and writer, Andrea Dezsö’s art is born from deeply personal narratives across a broad range of media including drawing, painting, artist's books, cut paper, embroidery, sculpture, installation, animation and large-scale murals. Dezsö's work has been shown in museums and galleries in America, Europe and Asia and reviewed in ArtForum, The New York Times, Village Voice, Wall Street Journal, NPR and New York magazine, among others. Her writing appeared in McSweeney's, Print, Blab and Esopus. Dezsö’s animations have been screened at film festivals and galleries in the US, Israel, the UK and Japan. "Community Garden," Dezsö's large-scale mosaic in New York City was awarded Best American Public Art in 2007 by Americans for the Arts. Dezsö has taught at Parsons School of Design and City College in New York, MICA in Baltimore, the Moholy-Nagy Hungarian University of Art & Design in Budapest, and has lectured extensively nationally and internationally. 

A Late 6th Century Coptic Binding: Codex C
Julia Miller
Five Coptic codices were found near Sakkara in Egypt around 1924. Two had leather spines and wooden covers, two had lost their covers, and one small volume, Codex C, was bound in remnants of a full maroon red goatskin cover over papyrus boards and fragments survive of an elaborate fore edge wrapping band with a bone slip; there is also evidence of a bookmark. This workshop will make a full-size model of Codex C. Students will start by making the papyrus boards, fold and trim paper as a substitute for the original parchment text, sew the text block, create simple end bands, line the spine, create the full leather binding, and make the wrapping band and bookmark. We will ‘cook’ and shape the bone slip. Then we will add ink decoration to the text edges (optional) and practice and apply the elaborate ink decoration to the covers and spine of Codex C that makes this small binding so distinctive. Finally, we will attach the wrapping band, bone slip, and bookmark. Participants will have the option to leave one side of their binding ‘open’ so the back of the text block, the sewing, end banding, and linen lining can be seen.The workshop will be supported with short lectures and handouts that include historical background information on Coptic bindings, a reading list, and class instructions. The instructor will bring a variety of historical models of early Coptic binding styles and related binding traditions for workshop participants to handle, study, and photograph.

Julia Miller is a bench-trained conservator who in recent years has turned her focus to the study and teaching of historical binding structure and style, with a special emphasis on early Coptic book structures. Julia has taught a variety of early structures around the U.S. and beyond, and has had the opportunity to travel to Cairo twice to study the bindings that originally sparked her interest in early bindings, the fourth century single-quire bindings known as the Nag Hammadi codices. In 2008 Julia received a Kress Foundation/FAIC conservation publication fellowship to support the writing of a book on historical structure and style titled Books Will Speak Plain: A Handbook for Identifying and Describing Historical Bindings, published by The Legacy Press and just released in December 2010. The book is directed toward curators, collectors, and conservators, and will be of interest to book artists who like to draw on historical structure as a platform for their own work. Early American bindings have been an area of growing interest; as a group they have been largely ignored in scholarly histories of binding. An example is a style described as American scaleboard bindings; Julia was in Philadelphia in the fall of 2010 on a month-long research fellowship at The Library Company to study scaleboard examples in the collection and develop a typology of these interesting, eccentric bindings, and she plans to write about and teach workshops on these neglected bindings in the future.

Fragments of Bookbinding Techniques
John Townsend
Book artists, bookbinders, and book conservators draw on an array of techniques that cover the entire two-millennium history of the codex form. Some have endured unchanged, others have altered with changes in materials and fashion, and new techniques have evolved. But nothing is obsolete – if it has ever been used it can be used again. This workshop will look to the nineteenth and early twentieth century trade binding manuals for some lesser known techniques that can still work for the artist, binder or conservator…techniques with traditional roots but with contemporary applications. Participants will produce a model of the classic “publishers board binding,” a satisfyingly simple and utilitarian paper/board structure that is surprisingly durable and endlessly adaptable for art and conservation. A second model will incorporate a miscellany of historic trade techniques in a single, non-historical binding, and a third will explore a quarter-leather “rounded and backed” binding for single section books as an alternative to simple pamphlet binding. Throughout the class students will encounter a variety of traditional tips, tricks, and techniques that can still make life at the bench more productive.
* There is an additional $20 materials fee per student for this class

John Townsend operates a small hand-bookbinding and conservation workshop in Sharon Springs, NY, known as Anonymous Bookbinder. He has been a bookbinder for over thirty years. John began his professional career as head of the Conservation Lab at the New York Public Library after graduating in the first class of Columbia University's Library Conservation and Preservation Program. He has also served as head of the NY State Conservation/Preservation Program, and as a preservation planning and evaluation consultant for SOLINET (Southeast Library Network), the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC), the National Library of Indonesia, the World Bank Global Environmental Facility, and for many other organizations and institutions. He is also a librarian with extensive experience in digital information technology and, immediately prior to becoming an anonymous bookbinder, he served as executive director of the New York State Higher Education Initiative.

Moku Hanga: The Japanese Woodblock Printing Technique
that Helped the Overthrow of Feudalism
Martin Vinaver
Japanese moku hangas are best known through the ukiyo-e images by Utamaro, Hiroshige and other artists from the Edo period. Ukiyo-e (meaning “images of the floating world”) thrived in Japan from 1603 to 1867. Ukiyo-e images, through the moku hanga technique were, as a movement, the decisive tool that helped overthrow the feudal system. Moku hanga greatly differs from the western woodblock printing technique in the following aspects: The Japanese technique makes use of odorless translucent water based pigments in layers that yield tone gradation possibilities. Its western counterpart uses oil based opaque inks, commonly with only one color. With moku hanga one can use many colors due to a combination of excellent registration marks and Japanese papers that do not shrink or stretch throughout the printing process. The baren, a small hand-held tool made with bamboo is used instead of the heavy iron etching presses. Students will learn to carve the Japanese way, make their own color and fixative preparation, transport brushes, paper preparation, inking and printing and learn to think in hanga-mode.

Martin Vinaver is a Mexican artist, painter, printer and sculptor who studied the woodblock ukiyo-e Japanese technique in Tokyo at the Yoshida Hanga Academy for four years, with third generation artist and teacher Tsukasa Yoshida. Vinaver is co-founder with lithographer Per Anderson of La Ceiba Gráfica, the most important graphic arts center with residencies in Mexico. After having co-created and designed the non-profit organization, he is now devoted to teaching moku hanga while developing all the necessary technical aspects needed to do it without importing Japanese tools and materials: making natural pigments, tools, paper and shop furniture. His own artwork integrates traditional skills with contemporary techniques and has been exhibited in several countries.

Questions?
Email: info@paperbookintensive.org
or contact Anna Embree, PBI Co-director at 205-348-2398